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Showing posts from April, 2011

Bread and Burritos in Springy San Francisco

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San Francisco's best Tartine bread basking in 4:59 pm light

I haven't been updating Cantaloupe Alone much, but I have not stopped eating. I know some people love to blog, twitter, and post while on vacation, but I'm in my element away from electronic devices. Today is my first day back from a quick 2 day trip to San Francisco visiting good friend and food lover / artist extrodianare Ava.

First stop: Tartine. Hands down the trip could have ended after a morning of sampling 1 gougère (light and cheesy), 1 scone (just nice), 1 almond croissant (monstrous and delicious), and 1 morning bun (the classic). The morning bun was so much more sophisticated then I imagined. Flaky croissant dough with crispy caramelized top with crusty and sweet bottom, hints of orange, rich but not overpoweringly decadent. Worth waiting in line for. Perfect with their bottomless coffee. I didn't remember my camera!

Tartine bread several minutes old

The next afternoon we happened to be biking home fro…

Vegetable Hunting in Early Spring

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I spent a solid 3 weeks consuming bread, cheese, meat, sugar, and dairy. Less of a craving, and more situational testing out recipes (scotch eggs, mac & cheese with bacon, shepard's pie, mushroom pot pie, rolls, crackers, and more obscene baked goods I'll show you later) and cooking for a big dinner party. This week I decided to veg out at the Grand Army Plaza farmer's market in Brooklyn. It's been a cold and wet spring in the New York City area, but you can still make a week's meal from the goods at the market. Cheese, meat, yogurt, flours, grains, legumes, pickles, jam, bread, cookies, and doughnuts are popular 52 weeks a year at the market. Hard vegetables and and hardy leafy greens are out too. Here is some of the veggie porn for your viewing:


Mushrooms, as expensive as meat but hardy and full of minerals and fiber. Don't chop the character of these unique shrooms as an ingredient in other dishes. Saute them in butter or oil and let them stand on…